Albums of the Year 2013

My albums of the year, countdown style. Was lucky to see Olafur Arnalds, Anoushka Shankar and Nick Harper, and had near misses with Steven Wilson and Arctic Monkeys. The list (which does contain albums penned outside of 2013) has been inspired in the main by my journey into the realms of yoga, meditation and reiki. Namaste:

10 – Clint Mansell (Moon Soundtrack). Former PWEI frontman turned composer, this soundtrack is sadly the best part of the film (which was good until half way through when the plot was revealed 40 mins early). Atmospheric, unlike the moon (or the film)…

09 – Hans Zimmer (Inception Soundtrack). Hans has produced numerous soundtracks for blockbuster films over the last decade, this being the one on the top of the pile for me. Mix that with one of the best films to come out of the last 10 years and you’d be a fool not to have this. Great for triathlon / Spartan training too…

08 – Agnes Obel (Aventine). My second intrusion into the realms of the neo-classicals, this quiet album is easy listening and relaxing and coupled with a soft lyric, is the ideal way to chill out after a day at a cut-throat corporation…

07 – Russill Paul (Shabda Yoga). Highly recommended by my 73 year old yoga master Pam, this one hits the chakras all right. Every time I listen to “Lokah Samastha” I float off to the moon like Neil the Hippy after being handed a particularly ‘heavy’ cigarette by Warlock…

06 – Nick Harper (Harperspace). An old one, but a classic. Went to see Nick again with Ruddock at Telfords in Chester. The album and the man himself live (and his snapping guitar strings) is something that I’ll never tire of…

05 – Arctic Monkeys (Humbug). This album came out when I was in Malaysia and only now have I given it air time. I recall it got a slating at the time it was released, but on my album counter, it is the one that has been played the most this year (behind Anathema’s Weather Systems of course)…

04 – Anoushka Shankar (Traces Of You). Heavy on the yoga, I was lucky enough to get a ticket to see her (and Olafur Arnalds) for ten English pounds in London, and she played 6 tracks from this. The album includes songs with Sting and Nora Jones. Great album for those practicing the Dhalsim yoga flame kick…

03 – Nine Inch Nails (Hesitation Marks). I’d have to say that most NIN albums contain some tracks which are album fodder, but in my opinion this album doesn’t and is the best work since “The Fragile”…

02 – Olafur Arnalds (For Now I Am Winter). Incredible compositions from a rising star on the neo-classical scene. I froze in time when I watched/heard him play at Fabric in London and “Only The Winds” came on. Sublime…

01 – Steven Wilson (The Raven That Refused To Sing). For lovers of Prog Rock this album is a must and my album of the year. If it doesn’t win the award for Progressive Rock Album of the Year 2014, I’ll eat my Slipperman costume…

Has Prof Cox beat me to it?

Professor Brian Cox will return to BBC2 with a new five-part series asking what it is to be human in a 2014 season of science programmes.

Cox has become one of the BBC’s most important faces following the success of his three Wonders … series looking at the solar system, the universe and life on earth.

His next series, Human Universe, will attempt to answer who we are, whether we are alone, and what is our destiny.

The BBC, announcing the new season of programmes on Wednesday, said Cox’s new series would “tackle the biggest questions that we can ask from who are we and are we alone, to why are we here and what is our destiny”.

“As humans, we have long sought to understand our place in the cosmos, looking for answers in the heavens and the earth, discovering clues in the endless forms of living things and wondering at the precious nature of human life,” it said.

As much as I would like to finish my blogathon in record time before this series airs, it’s highly probable that I won’t. Instead and in true Scouse fashion, I may rob bits of it and claim it as my own…

L.O.G.I.C (‘Lineating’ Our Growth Into Consciousness)

What is logic. Logic from the Greek word logos (“a ground”, “a plea”, “an opinion”) has two meanings. First, it describes the use of valid reasoning in an activity. Second, it names the normative study of reasoning or a branch thereof. In the latter sense, it features most prominently in the subject of philosophy.

I set out my quest a number of years ago now with my very first Infinity Beckons post ‘Do amoebas have souls?’ and an awful lot has happened since then. An awful lot. I guess it was the first time in my life that I sat down (a frozen bench on a cold platform on the outskirts of a freezing London) waiting for a train, my netbook quickly draining of power, trying to capture for the first time my first baby steps into why are we here.

Since then, I have read a fair amount. I have ‘YouTubed’ and Netflixed’ my way to being semi-informed. I have postured, postulated and ‘pranad’ my way in to the inners worlds of the yogis and reiki masters. All such things have had a real positive effect on me (on the whole).

A few weeks back, Ruddo and I went to see Nick Harper in Chester’s Telford Warehouse, and in truth I was probably keener to meet up with my old chum more than listening to Nick, on the basis that he had recently finished Anthony Peakes ‘Is There Life after Death (ITLAD): A scientific explanation of what happens when we die’. The car journey (and I don’t say journeys plural as the one on the way back was not the most lucid – from a Peroni perspective) and most of the evening was spent discussing the theories of life and the universe(s) contained within the book and beyond.

We both concurred that the rhetoric in Richard Dawkins book ‘The God Delusion’ was wholly unnecessary, but that one thing of note in the book was his ‘Spectrum of Probability’; the sliding scale of the belief in God:

1. Strong theist. 100 per cent probability of God. In the words of C.G. Jung: “I do not believe, I know.”
2. De facto theist. Very high probability but short of 100 per cent. “I don’t know for certain, but I strongly believe in God and live my life on the assumption that he is there.”
3. Leaning towards theism. Higher than 50 per cent but not very high. “I am very uncertain, but I am inclined to believe in God.”
4. Completely impartial. Exactly 50 per cent. “God’s existence and non-existence are exactly equiprobable.”
5. Leaning towards Agnosticism. Lower than 50 per cent but not very low. “I do not know whether God exists but I’m inclined to be skeptical.”
6. De facto atheist. Very low probability, but short of zero. “I don’t know for certain but I think God is very improbable, and I live my life on the assumption that he is not there.”
7. Strong atheist. “I know there is no God, with the same conviction as Jung knows there is one.”

We also agreed and that as things have been presented to us (both of logical minds), as true splinter-bearing fence-sitters, we have set up temporary tents at the Agnostic campsite at #5.

I guess 2 years on and I’m still somewhat toasting marshmallows on the Agnostic calor gas stove, but I think that of late, I am progressing back towards Atheism at #6, mainly down to my studies on the history of organised religion and the evolution of consciousness. So the logical part of me says.

Let’s take a look at the film Zeitgeist and lay down some basics facts. Not conspiracy theories (although I’m sure some people would say they were) nor science-based (or biased) points of views, but facts. Historical facts. Historical facts as documented in texts (religious and otherwise) throughout the ages. I managed to find a transcript of the film which I have pasted in below. The logical part of my brain (coupled with the logical scribbling of Pierro Scaruffi of my last post) is now pretty much convinced that “I don’t know for certain but I think God is very improbable, and I live my life on the assumption that he is not there.” One thing I am certain of, Christianity is a sham…

Zeitgeist – The History of Religion

As far back as 10,000 B.C, history is abundant with carvings and writings reflecting people’s respect and adoration for the sun. And it is simple to understand why as every morning the sun would rise, bringing vision, warmth, and security, saving man from the cold, blind, predator-filled darkness of night. Without it, the cultures understood, the crops would not grow, and life on the planet would not survive. These realities made the sun the most adored object of all time. Likewise, they were also very aware of the stars. The tracking of the stars allowed them to recognize and anticipate events which occurred over long periods of time, such as eclipses and full moons. They in turn catalogued celestial groups into what we know today as constellations.

The cross of the Zodiac is one of the oldest conceptual images in human history. It reflects the sun as it figuratively passes through the 12 major constellations over the course of a year. It also reflects the 12 months of the year, the 4 seasons, and the solstices and equinoxes. The term Zodiac relates to the fact that constellations were anthropomorphized, or personified, as figures, or animals.

In other words, the early civilizations did not just follow the sun and stars, they personified them with elaborate myths involving their movements and relationships. The sun, with its life-giving and -saving qualities was personified as a representative of the unseen creator or god… “God’s Sun,” the light of the world, the saviour of human kind. Likewise, the 12 constellations represented places of travel for God’s Sun and were identified by names, usually representing elements of nature that happened during that period of time. For example, Aquarius, the water bearer, who brings the Spring rains.

Horus was the Sun God of Egypt of around 3000 BC. He is the sun, anthropomorphized, and his life is a series of allegorical myths involving the sun’s movement in the sky. From the ancient hieroglyphics in Egypt, we know much about this solar messiah. For instance, Horus, being the sun, or the light, had an enemy known as Set, and Set was the personification of the darkness or night. And, metaphorically speaking, every morning Horus would win the battle against Set – while in the evening, Set would conquer Horus and send him into the underworld. It is important to note that “dark vs. light” or “good vs. evil” is one of the most ubiquitous mythological dualities ever known and is still expressed on many levels to this day.

Broadly speaking, the story of Horus is as follows: Horus was born on December 25th of the virgin Isis-Meri. His birth was accompanied by a star in the east, which in turn, three kings followed to locate and adorn the new-born savior. At the age of 12, he was a prodigal child teacher, and at the age of 30 he was baptized by a figure known as Anup and thus began his ministry. Horus had 12 disciples he travelled about with, performing miracles such as healing the sick and walking on water. Horus was known by many gestural names such as The Truth, The Light, God’s Anointed Son, The Good Shepherd, The Lamb of God, and many others. After being betrayed by Typhon, Horus was crucified, buried for 3 days, and thus, resurrected.

These attributes of Horus, whether original or not, seem to permeate in many cultures of the world, for many other gods are found to have the same general mythological structure.

Attis, of Phyrigia, born of the virgin Nana on December 25th, crucified, placed in a tomb and after 3 days, was resurrected.

Krishna, of India, born of the virgin Devaki with a star in the east signalling his coming, performed miracles with his disciples, and upon his death was resurrected.

Dionysus of Greece, born of a virgin on December 25th, was a travelling teacher who performed miracles such as turning water into wine, he was referred to as the “King of Kings,” “God’s Only Begotten Son,” “The Alpha and Omega,” and many others, and upon his death, he was resurrected.

Mithra, of Persia, born of a virgin on December 25th, he had 12 disciples and performed miracles, and upon his death was buried for 3 days and thus resurrected, he was also referred to as “The Truth,” “The Light,” and many others. Interestingly, the sacred day of worship of Mithra was Sunday.

The fact of the matter is there are numerous saviours, from different periods, from all over the world, which subscribe to these general characteristics. The question remains: why these attributes, why the virgin birth on December 25th, why dead for three days and the inevitable resurrection, why 12 disciples or followers? To find out, let’s examine the most recent of the solar messiahs.

Jesus Christ was born of the virgin Mary on December 25th in Bethlehem, his birth was announced by a star in the east, which three kings or magi followed to locate and adorn the new saviour. He was a child teacher at 12, at the age of 30 he was baptized by John the Baptist, and thus began his ministry. Jesus had 12 disciples which he travelled about with performing miracles such as healing the sick, walking on water, raising the dead, he was also known as the “King of Kings,” the “Son of God,” the “Light of the World,” the “Alpha and Omega,” the “Lamb of God,” and many others. After being betrayed by his disciple Judas and sold for 30 pieces of silver, he was crucified, placed in a tomb and after 3 days was resurrected and ascended into Heaven.

First of all, the birth sequence is completely astrological. The star in the east is Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky, which, on December 24th, aligns with the 3 brightest stars in Orion’s Belt. These 3 bright stars are called today what they were called in ancient times: The Three Kings. The Three Kings and the brightest star, Sirius, all point to the place of the sunrise on December 25th. This is why the Three Kings “follow” the star in the east, in order to locate the sunrise — the birth of the sun.

The Virgin Mary is the constellation Virgo, also known as Virgo the Virgin. Virgo in Latin means virgin. The ancient glyph for Virgo is the altered “m”. This is why Mary along with other virgin mothers, such as Adonis’s mother Myrrha, or Buddha’s mother Maya begin with an M. Virgo is also referred to as the House of Bread, and the representation of Virgo is a virgin holding a sheaf of wheat. This House of Bread and its symbol of wheat represents August and September, the time of harvest. In turn, Bethlehem, in fact, literally translates to “house of bread”. Bethlehem is thus a reference to the constellation Virgo , a place in the sky, not on Earth.

There is another very interesting phenomenon that occurs around December 25th, or the winter solstice. From the summer solstice to the winter solstice, the days become shorter and colder. From the perspective of the northern hemisphere, the sun appears to move south and get smaller and more scarce. The shortening of the days and the expiration of the crops when approaching the winter solstice symbolized the process of death to the ancients. It was the death of the Sun. By December 22nd, the Sun’s demise was fully realized, for the Sun, having moved south continually for 6 months, makes it to its lowest point in the sky. Here a curious thing occurs: the Sun stops moving south, at least perceivably, for 3 days. During this 3 day pause, the Sun resides in the vicinity of the Southern Cross, or Crux, constellation. And after this time on December 25th, the Sun moves 1 degree, this time north, foreshadowing longer days, warmth, and Spring. And thus it was said: the Sun died on the cross, was dead for 3 days, only to be resurrected or born again. This is why Jesus and numerous other Sun Gods share the crucifixion, 3-day death, and resurrection concept. It is the Sun’s transition period before it shifts its direction back into the Northern Hemisphere, bringing Spring, and thus salvation.

However, they did not celebrate the resurrection of the Sun until the spring equinox, or Easter. This is because at the spring equinox, the Sun officially overpowers the evil darkness, as daytime thereafter becomes longer in duration than night, and the revitalizing conditions of spring emerge.

Now, probably the most obvious of all the astrological symbolism around Jesus regards the 12 disciples. They are simply the 12 constellations of the Zodiac, which Jesus, being the Sun, travels about with.

In fact, the number 12 is replete throughout the Bible. This text has more to do with astrology than anything else.

Coming back to the cross of the Zodiac, the figurative life of the Sun, this was not just an artistic expression or tool to track the Sun’s movements. It was also a Pagan spiritual symbol, the shorthand of which looked like this. This is not a symbol of Christianity. It is a Pagan adaptation of the cross of the Zodiac. This is why Jesus in early occult art is always shown with his head on the cross, for Jesus is the Sun, the Sun of God, the Light of the World, the Risen Saviour, who will “come again,” as it does every morning, the Glory of God who defends against the works of darkness, as he is “born again” every morning, and can be seen “coming in the clouds,” “up in Heaven,” with his “Crown of Thorns,” or, sun rays.

Now, of the many astrological-astronomical metaphors in the Bible, one of the most important has to do with the ages. Throughout the scripture there are numerous references to the “Age.” In order to understand this, we need to be familiar with the phenomenon known as the precession of the equinoxes. The ancient Egyptians along with cultures long before them recognized that approximately every 2150 years the sunrise on the morning of the spring equinox would occur at a different sign of the Zodiac. This has to do with a slow angular wobble that the Earth maintains as it rotates on its axis. It is called a precession because the constellations go backwards, rather than through the normal yearly cycle. The amount of time that it takes for the precession to go through all 12 signs is roughly 25,765 years. This is also called the “Great Year,” and ancient societies were very aware of this. They referred to each 2150 year period as an “age.” From 4300BC to 2150BC, it was the Age of Taurus, the Bull. From 2150BC to 1AD, it was the Age of Aries, the Ram, and from 1AD. to 2150AD it is the Age of Pisces, the age we are still in to this day, and in and around 2150, we will enter the new age: the Age of Aquarius.

Now, the Bible reflects, broadly speaking, a symbolic movement through 3 ages, while foreshadowing a 4th. In the Old Testament when Moses comes down Mount Sinai with the 10 Commandments, he is very upset to see his people worshiping a golden bull calf. In fact, he shattered the stone tablets and instructed his people to kill each other in order to purify themselves. Most Biblical scholars would attribute this anger to the fact that the Israelites were worshiping a false idol, or something to that effect. The reality is that the golden bull is Taurus the Bull, and Moses represents the new Age of Aries the Ram. This is why Jews even today still blow the Ram’s horn. Moses represents the new Age of Aries, [S111] and upon the new age, everyone must shed the old age. Other deities mark these transitions as well, a pre-Christian god who kills the bull, in the same symbology.

Now Jesus is the figure who ushers in the age following Aries, the Age of Pisces the Two Fish. Fish symbolism is very abundant in the New Testament. Jesus feeds 5000 people with bread and “2 fish.” When he begins his ministry walking along Galilei, he befriends 2 fisherman, who follow him. And I think we’ve all seen the Jesus-fish on the backs of people’s cars. Little do they know what it actually means. It is a Pagan astrological symbolism for the Sun’s Kingdom during the Age of Pisces. Also, Jesus’ assumed birth date is essentially the start of this age.

At Luke 22:10 when Jesus is asked by his disciples where the next passover will be, Jesus replied: “Behold, when ye are entered into the city, there shall a man meet you bearing a pitcher of water… follow him into the house where he entereth in.” This scripture is by far one of the most revealing of all the astrological references. The man bearing a pitcher of water is Aquarius, the water-bearer, who is always pictured as a man pouring out a pitcher of water. He represents the age after Pisces, and when the Sun (God’s Sun) leaves the Age of Pisces (Jesus), it will go into the House of Aquarius, as Aquarius follows Pisces in the precession of the equinoxes. Also Jesus is saying is that after the Age of Pisces will come the Age of Aquarius.

Now, we have all heard about the end times and the end of the world. Apart from the cartoonish depictions in the Book of Revelation, the main source of this idea comes from Matthew 28:20, where Jesus says “I will be with you even to the end of the world.” However, in King James Version, “world” is a mistranslation, among many mistranslations. The actual word being used is “aeon”, which means “age.” “I will be with you even to the end of the age.” Which is true, as Jesus’ Solar Piscean personification will end when the Sun enters the Age of Aquarius. The entire concept of end times and the end of the world is a misinterpreted astrological allegory. Let’s tell that to the approximately 100 million people in America who believe the end of the world is coming.

Furthermore, the character of Jesus, a literary and astrological hybrid, is most explicitly a plagiarization of the Egyptian Sun-god Horus. For example, inscribed about 3500 years, on the walls of the Temple of Luxor in Egypt are images of the enunciation, the immaculate conception, the birth, and the adoration of Horus. The images begin with Thaw announcing to the virgin Isis that she will conceive Horus, then Nef the holy ghost impregnating the virgin, and then the virgin birth and the adoration. This is exactly the story of Jesus’ miracle conception. In fact, the literary similarities between the Egyptian religion and the Christian religion are staggering.

And the plagiarism is continuous. The story of Noah and Noah’s Ark is taken directly from tradition. The concept of a Great Flood is ubiquitous throughout the ancient world, with over 200 different cited claims in different periods and times. However, one need look no further for a pre-Christian source than the Epic of Gilgamesh, written in 2600BC. This story talks of a Great Flood commanded by God, an Ark with saved animals upon it, and even the release and return of a dove, all held in common with the biblical story, among many other similarities.

And then there is the plagiarized story of Moses. Upon Moses’ birth, it is said that he was placed in a reed basket and set adrift in a river in order to avoid infanticide. He was later rescued by a daughter of royalty and raised by her as a Prince. This baby in a basket story was lifted directly from the myth of Sargon of Akkad of around 2250BC Sargon was born, placed in a reed basket in order to avoid infanticide, and set adrift in a river. He was in turn rescued and raised by Akki, a royal mid-wife.

Furthermore, Moses is known as the Law Giver, the giver of the Ten Commandments, the Mosaic Law. However, the idea of a Law being passed from God to a prophet on a mountain is also a very old motif. Moses is just a law giver in a long line of law givers in mythological history. In India, Manou was the great law giver. In Crete, Minos ascended Mount Dicta, where Zeus gave him the sacred laws. While in Egypt there was Mises, who carried stone tablets and upon them the laws of god were written.

And as far as the Ten Commandments, they are taken outright from Spell 125 of the Egyptian Book of the Dead. What the Book of the Dead phrased “I have not stolen” became “Thou shall not steal,” “I have not killed” became “Thou shall not kill,” “I have not told lies” became “Thou shall not bear false witness” and so forth. In fact, the Egyptian religion is likely the primary foundational basis for the Judeo-Christian theology. Baptism, afterlife, final judgment, virgin birth and resurrection, crucifixion, the ark of the covenant, circumcision, saviours, holy communion, the great flood, Easter, Christmas, Passover, and many many more, are all attributes of Egyptian ideas, long predating Christianity and Judaism.

Justin Martyr, one of the first Christian historians and defenders, wrote: “When we say that he, Jesus Christ, our teacher, was produced without sexual union, was crucified and died, and rose again, and ascended into Heaven, we propound nothing different from what you believe regarding those who you esteem Sons of Jupiter.” In a different writing, Justin Martyr said “He was born of a virgin, accept this in common with what you believe of Perseus.” It’s obvious that Justin and other early Christians knew how similar Christianity was to the Pagan religions. However, Justin had a solution. As far as he was concerned, the Devil did it. The Devil had the foresight to come before Christ, and create these characteristics in the Pagan world.

The Bible is nothing more than an astro-theological literary fold hybrid, just like nearly all religious myths before it. In fact, the aspect of transference, of one character’s attributes to a new character, can be found within the book itself. In the Old Testament there’s the story of Joseph. Joseph was a prototype for Jesus. Joseph was born of a miracle birth, Jesus was born of a miracle birth. Joseph was of 12 brothers, Jesus had 12 disciples. Joseph was sold for 20 pieces of silver, Jesus was sold for 30 pieces of silver. Brother “Judah” suggests the sale of Joseph, disciple “Judas” suggests the sale of Jesus. Joseph began his work at the age of 30, Jesus began his work at the age of 30. The parallels go on and on.

Furthermore, is there any non-Biblical historical evidence of any person, living with the name Jesus, the Son of Mary, who traveled about with 12 followers, healing people and the like? There are numerous historians who lived in and around the Mediterranean either during or soon after the assumed life of Jesus. How many of these historians document this figure? Not one. However, to be fair, that doesn’t mean defenders of the Historical Jesus haven’t claimed the contrary. Four historians are typically referenced to justify Jesus’s existence. Pliny the younger, Suetonius, Tacitus and the first three. Each one of their entries consists of only a few sentences at best and only refer to the Christus or the Christ, which in fact is not name but a title. It means the “Anointed one” The fourth source is Josephus and this source has been proven to be a forgery for hundreds of years. Sadly, it is still cited as truth.

You would think that a guy who rose from the dead and ascended into Heaven for all eyes to see and performed the wealth of miracles acclaimed to him would have made it into the historical record. It didn’t because once the evidence is weighed, there are very high odds that the figure known as Jesus, did not even exist.

The reality is, Jesus was the Solar Deity of the Gnostic Christian sect, and like all other Pagan gods, he was a mythical figure. It was the political establishment that sought to historize the Jesus figure for social control. By 325AD in Rome, emperor Constantine convened the Council of Nicea. It was during this meeting that the politically motivated Christian Doctrines were established and thus began a long history of Christian bloodshed and spiritual fraud. And for the next 1600 years, the Vatican maintained a political stranglehold on all of Europe, leading to such joyous periods as the Dark Ages, along with enlightening events such as the Crusades, and the Inquisition.

Christianity, along with all other theistic belief systems, is the fraud of the age. It serves to detach the species from the natural world, and likewise, each other. It supports blind submission to authority. It reduces human responsibility to the effect that “God” controls everything, and in turn awful crimes can be justified in the name of Divine Pursuit. And most importantly, it empowers those who know the truth but use the myth to manipulate and control societies. The religious myth is the most powerful device ever created, and serves as the psychological soil upon which other myths can flourish.

So where does that leave me…

It ‘proves’ for me that Christ probably never existed in the first place, either that or he was very probably just a hippy, an ancient Nelson Mandela / Martin Luther King type character and not the son of God, assassinated because he started to question order.

But religion is only one part of my next blog. The ultimate blog. A blogathon even.

Starting tomorrow, I will be blogging my own logical perception of the history of everything. There will be no doubt that some questions will remain unanswered, but my first challenge is to create that definitive list of what it is I am seeking.

Sadly I may not find any answers, but I will literally die trying.

My linear look at the history of everything will be thus:

Chapter 1: …The Beginning
Chapter 2: Big Bang
Chapter 3: Milky Way
Chapter 4: Solar System
Chapter 5: Earth
Chapter 6: Primordial life
Chapter 7: Simple creatures
Chapter 8: Fish
Chapter 9: Reptiles
Chapter 10: Mammals
Chapter 11: Primates
Chapter 12: Homo Sapiens
Chapter 13: Groups
Chapter 14: Thought
Chapter 15: Language
Chapter 16: Consciousness
Chapter 17: Metaphor/Analogy/Mythology
Chapter 18: Rules/Order
Chapter 19: Religion
Chapter 20: Politics
Chapter 21: Economics
Chapter 22: Greed/Shortage
Chapter 23: War/Death
Chapter 24: The End…